Monthly Archives: September 2013

The Waiting — Author’s Reflection


A struggling friend recently asked: “Do dreams really come true?”

I responded with: We’ve been programmed to believe that once people reach their dreams the next line in the story is “happily ever after.” Truth is, though that life goes on. Dreams fade and are forgotten. Was it a dream come true on your wedding day? Graduation day? Fill in the blank. My guess is yes. But instead of the platitude one liner: happily ever after. There was a new chapter. Thank God for new chapters and new dreams.

A different friend in a different context once lamented: “The American dream is dead.”

What is it about dreams that so captivate us? Why do we so often spend so much time and energy chasing dreams?

Could it be that the world as we experience it with our 5 or 6 senses (sense of time) is not all that there is? Could it be that in addition to the physical world there truly is a spiritual world? And that we sense with our bodies but we dream with our souls?

Colossians 2:8 (NIV) reminds us to: “See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the elemental spiritual forces of this world rather than on Christ.”

That world between worlds — between sensing and dreaming — between body and soul — I strove to capture that elusive world in my poem,

The Waiting

Silence, darkness
Lying here
Waiting, waiting patiently
For sleep to carry me away

To a fanciful place
Flying, flirting
Fearlessly fighting
Fears, fiends and foes

Drifting, drifting
Slowly drifting
In and out
Of that fancy land

Falling, failing
Falling, failing
Almost there
But not quite yet

Waiting, waiting
Patiently waiting
For sleep
To carry me away

© 2013, Dr. Phil Bryant

Dr. Bryant is an Assistant Professor of Management at Columbus State University and co-author of Managing Employee Turnover.

1 Comment

Filed under Phil's Philosophy

Do dreams really come true?


Phil Bryant We’ve been programmed to think that once people reach their dreams the next line is “happily ever after.” Truth is, though that life goes on. Dreams fade and are forgotten. Was it a dream come true on your wedding day? Graduation day? Fill in the blank. My guess is yes. But instead of the platitude one liner: happily ever after. There was a new chapter. Thank God for the new chapters and new dreams.

Dr. Phil Bryant

Leave a comment

Filed under Phil's Philosophy

The Great Trade — Author’s Reflection


You’ve probably not noticed that “The Great Trade” is a nearly exact excerpt from my much longer poem, “The Greatest of Sermons.

If you have noticed, a) I thank you for following my work so closely, and b) I commend you for reading through my longest of poems.

Why take an excerpt from one poem, change it only ever so slightly, and call it another? Because I believe that 1) most folks won’t read “The Greatest of Sermons” in its entirety, but 2) the message in its refrain has such importance that it deserves its own space.

The message of “The Great Trade” parallels the primary message of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount; that being a true follower of Christ is not about our unwavering obedience to God’s commands. Its about unwavering commitment to the One who obeyed God’s commands for us and took on the punishment we deserved for disobedience.

I’m reminded of the scene from the movie The Matrix. The little boy tells Neo, “Do not try and bend the spoon. That’s impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you’ll see that it is not the spoon that bends. It is only yourself.”

Rephrased within the context of being a true follower of Christ, the boy might say, “Do not try to live sinlessly. That’s impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth. Then you’ll see that it is not you that earns your salvation, it is Christ who earns it on your behalf.

I hope you enjoy,

The Great Trade

But Jesus, what you’ve told us, it can’t be done.
No, no one is righteous, not even one.
What can we do to earn your reward?
What you require, its just too hard.
Who can fulfill your every command?
It can’t be accomplished by a mere mortal man!

Jesus replied: “you can’t. But I can.
I’ll open the door to the promised land.
I’ll live the life you cannot live.
I’ll give the death you cannot give.
I’ll conquer death. I’ll conquer sin.
So take my hand; I’ll let you in.”

© Dr. Phil Bryant

1 Comment

Filed under Phil's Philosophy

Employee Supervision & Engagement


Employee performance, team performance, organizational productivity and financial performance have all been tied to high levels of employee engagement.

Organizations can increase employee engagement by providing:

— proper and fair procedures and distribution of rewards and recognition,

— clear communication and guidance from leadership,

— employee support &

— an enriched job experience.

I use my training and experience as a Yellow, Green and Black Belt in Six Sigma to Define, Measure, and Analyze your organization’s current employee engagement levels; and within just one week, offer Improvements and Controls for future employee engagement levels.

Contact me via linkedin for more information.

© 2013, Dr. Phil Bryant

Dr. Bryant is an Assistant Professor of Management at Columbus State University and co-author of Managing Employee Turnover.

Leave a comment

Filed under Consulting Corner

Earn 10’s of Thousands MORE $DOLLARS!


A well crafted resume – one designed to rise to the top of the stack – may earn you TENS OF THOUSANDS OF $DOLLARS MORE than an average resume.

Here’s why.

The best positions at the best companies often attract hundreds of resumes. Of these, usually no more than 10% are granted an interview. If your resume does not stand out over more than 90% of competing resumes, you lose. You lose $Dollars in time and in salary.

You lose $Dollars in time…  The more resumes yours stands out over, the more interviews you will have, and the sooner you will receive a job offer. The difference could be a matter of months. If you are looking for a job in the $36,000-$48,000 pay range, a couple of months translates to a loss of $6,000-$8,000. 

You lose $Dollars in salary, too. The less attractive jobs, by definition, will attract fewer resumes. Only for these jobs does the average resume stand a chance at an interview. They’ll probably interview at least three candidates. If only ten resumes are submitted, your resume only has to be in the top 70%. If the position is even less attractive and only 5 resumes are submitted, your resume has only to be in the top 60% (the bottom 40%). Almost by definition, these less attractive positions are expected to pay lower salaries. A less attractive position in a field known to pay in the range of $36,000-$48,000 may pay closer to $36,000. The more attractive position may pay closer to $48,000 — translating to a $12,000 loss per year!

In just 14 months an average resume has cost up to $20,000! After 24 months, over $30,000!

Might it be worth just $100 to have a professional review and rewrite your resume?

Contact me via the form below if you are ready to save  TENS OF THOUSANDS OF $DOLLARS.

© 2013, Dr. Phil Bryant

  Dr. Bryant is an Assistant Professor of Management at Columbus State University and co-author of Managing Employee Turnover.

4 Comments

Filed under Management Musings, Uncategorized